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Eudoxia

Wife of Arcadius and daughter of Theodosius I

Eudoxia was the wife of the Roman emperor Arcadius and wielded a powerful influence over him. Arcadius didn’t seem to have either the intelligence or the will to rule the vast Late Roman Byzantine Empire and was heavily influenced by the officers and ministers of his consistory.

Eudoxia, like many of the women in the house of Theodosius I had a strong personality. She easily dominated her husband when it came to affairs of state. She had two very powerful enemies with which she had to deal, and she eventually brought about the ruin of both of them. The troubles with John of Cappadocia were simply struggles over power and turf. John of Cappadocia was Arcadius’ praetorian prefect who extorted every last penny in taxes out of the citizens of Constantinople. John Chrysostom (in Greek, Chrysostom is a name meaning The Golden Mouthed) was another individual who had incurred her wrath because his sermons about immorality seemed to be aimed directly at her. Eudoxia was able to get both men banished to inhospitable towns on the frontiers of the empire.

Eudoxia was the wife of the Roman emperor Arcadius and wielded a powerful influence over him. Arcadius didn’t seem to have either the intelligence or the will to rule the vast Late Roman Byzantine Empire and was heavily influenced by the officers and ministers of his consistory.

Eudoxia, like many of the women in the house of Theodosius I had a strong personality. She easily dominated her husband when it came to affairs of state. She had two very powerful enemies with which she had to deal, and she eventually brought about the ruin of both of them. The troubles with John of Cappadocia were simply struggles over power and turf. John of Cappadocia was Arcadius’ praetorian prefect who extorted every last penny in taxes out of the citizens of Constantinople. John Chrysostom (in Greek, Chrysostom is a name meaning The Golden Mouthed) was another individual who had incurred her wrath because his sermons about immorality seemed to be aimed directly at her. Eudoxia was able to get both men banished to inhospitable towns on the frontiers of the empire.


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